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Fish Ohio
Written by Staff Reports   
Friday, July 25, 2014 8:00 PM

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

Division of Wildlife

NORTHWEST OHIO

Bucyrus Reservoir #1 (40 acres; Crawford County) – Anglers can expect to catch largemouth bass, channel catfish, bluegill and bullheads this time of year; fish the cover along the shore consisting of timber, brush and weeds. Anglers seeking out largemouth bass should try minnows, plastic worms, tube jigs and crankbaits. A primitive boat ramp is available, off SR 98, just east of Beechgrove Road; there are no motor restrictions but boats must operate at “no-wake” speeds.

Resthaven Wildlife Area (444 acres; Erie County) – With 10 different ponds, anglers should still be able to hook into some largemouth bass this time of year; typical lures include plastic worms and crankbaits. Pond 7 is also excellent for carp; for something new, try bow fishing from the access roads or from a boat. Boats may be used on the ponds; however, no boat ramps are available at most of the ponds; Pond 8 does have a boat ramp and a handicapped-accessible fishing pier. Gasoline motors up to 9.9 HP may be used on all ponds.

LAKE ERIE

The daily bag limit for walleye on Ohio waters of Lake Erie is 6 fish per angler; minimum size limit is 15 inches. … The daily bag limit for yellow perch is 30 fish per angler on all Ohio waters of Lake Erie. … Through Aug. 31 the trout and salmon daily bag limit is 5 fish per angler; minimum size limit is 12 inches. … The daily bag limit for black bass (largemouth and smallmouth bass) in Ohio waters of Lake Erie is 5 fish per angler; minimum size limit is 14 inches.

Western Basin

Walleye: Fishing has been good north of West Sister Island, off Magee Marsh, west and north of “A” can of the Camp Perry firing range, around northwest reef and west of Rattlesnake Island. Anglers trolling are using worm harnesses with inline weights, divers or bottom-bouncers and spoons pulled behind divers; anglers casting are using mayfly rigs or are drifting with bottom bouncers and worm harnesses.

Yellow Perch: Fishing has been good just off Turtle Island, between Green and Rattlesnake islands and from Marblehead to Kelleys Island. Perch-spreaders with shiners fished near the bottom produce the most fish.

 
Delphos Blues 2nd in tourney
Written by Information submitted   
Thursday, July 24, 2014 8:00 PM
The Delphos Blue Pony League team finished second to Glandorf recently in the tournament title game. Members of the team were, front row, left to right, Austin Adams, Chandler Skym, Colin Will, Connor Anspach and Tyler Bratton; and second row, coach Sam Miller, Damien Jones, Hunter Bonifas, Troy Elwer, Cioran Shanahan, Connor Hulihan and Matthew Miller. (Photo submitted)
 
Langer leads British Senior by two after first round
Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, July 24, 2014 8:00 PM

Associated Press

 

BRIDGEND, Wales — Bernhard Langer made a statement of intent when he opened with a 6-under-par 65 to take a 2-stroke lead over American Bob Tway in the British Senior Open at a sweltering Royal Porthcawl on Thursday.

Langer, who threw away a 2-stroke lead on the final hole at Royal Birkdale last year and then was beaten for the title in a playoff, was out in a best-of-the-day 31.

He birdied the third, fourth, sixth and eighth holes and went 5 under when he birdied the long 13th. He dropped a shot at the 16th but then hit back immediately with birdies at the two closing holes.

“Six under is very satisfying,” Langer said. “I played smart, some good, some great.

“I kept it out of the bunkers and out of the hay and gave myself some opportunities. And I’m pleased with a birdie-birdie finish.”

Langer is trying to add a second British Senior title to the one he won at Carnoustie in 2010.

Tway set the early target at 4-under 67, with birdies at the first, sixth, 12th and 13th, and no dropped shots.

“It was a pleasure to play a nice round of golf on a great golf course,” Tway said. “I probably should have bogeyed a couple of holes coming in but I got lucky.”

Chris Williams of England was alone in third on a bogey-free 68 with birdies at Nos. 2, 4 and 6, while Andrew Oldcorn of Scotland was a stroke behind in fourth. Spain’s Pedro Linhart and Canadian Rick Gibson were tied for fifth on 70.

Mark Wiebe, who beat Langer in last year’s playoff and played with him in the first round, carded 5-over 76.

Colin Montgomerie, bidding for his third successive seniors’ major, was on 74 with just two birdies and three dropped shots.

Tom Watson had a roller-coaster front nine of 1-over 36, steadied the ship for five holes after the turn, then dropped three strokes on successive holes before birdieing the last for a 3-over 74.

On the way out he birdied the first, dropped a stroke at the next three holes, parred No. 5, birdied the sixth, dropped a stroke at the seventh, birdied the eighth and parred the ninth.

The winner at Royal Birkdale two years ago, Fred Couples, was out in 39 after a triple-bogey eight at the long sixth but stormed back with a birdie-eagle-birdie run from the 12th to get back to level, dropped a stroke at the 16th and birdied the last to be back in 32 for a par 71.

Taiwan sweeps US in 1st day of International Crown

OWINGS MILLS, Md. — A winless day left the top-seeded United States with the feeling there’s nothing left to lose in their quest to capture the International Crown

Yani Tseng made a 12-foot birdie putt on the 18th hole to give Taiwan a sweep of the Americans in the opening round of the 32-player, eight-team tournament Thursday.

Tseng and Phoebe Yao never trailed in a 1-up win over Stacy Lewis and Lexi Thompson after Candie Kung and Teresa Lu beat Paula Creamer and Cristie Kerr 4 and 3.

“There’s probably more pressure with being No. 1 but we all knew coming into match play that anything can happen,” Lewis said. “It always comes down to one putt here and there.”

Tseng made the winning putt after Lewis failed from a bit farther out on her own birdie try.

“I haven’t had this feeling for a long time,” Tseng said. “I made that birdie putt; my hands were shaking.”

Thompson and Lewis had little doubt about whether the ball was going to drop.

Each team receives two points for a win and one for a tie. The U.S. was the only team that failed to secure a point on the first day.

“You just have to keep positive and try to find the good in the day,” Kerr said. “We’re going to be coming out guns a blazing. We have nothing to lose from here on in.”

Today, the United States will face Spain (3 points) in Pool A, and Taiwan (4) will take on Thailand (1). Pool B matchups are Japan (3) against Australia (2) and South Korea (2) versus Sweden (1).

Taiwan, which entered as the No. 8 seed, now appears to be the team to beat.

Japan took the lead in Pool B with a strong performance against Sweden. Although the Japanese team of Ai Miyazato and Sakura Yokomine led from start to finish, it took a birdie on No. 18 by Yokomine to secure a 2-up win over Pernilla Lindberg and Mikaela Parmlid.

 
Pucker up! NASCAR returns to Brickyard
Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, July 24, 2014 8:00 PM

Associated Press

 

INDIANAPOLIS — Dale Jarrett loved his win so much he had to celebrate it with a kiss.

His impromptu smooch with the bricks in 1996 has blossomed into a tradition for drivers of all series when they win at the famed Brickyard. It’s time to pucker up again: NASCAR runs its 21st Sprint Cup race Sunday at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Jarrett started a love affair that lasts to this day and has crossed racing series all the way to the Indianapolis 500. Back in ‘96, Jarrett and crew chief Todd Parrott kneeled down and planted a big ol’ kiss on the bricks that serve as the start-finish line at the venerable speedway.

“It’s something I would like to take all the credit for,” said Jarrett, who also won in 1999.

Winners of the Indy 500 usually drink milk after the race. Jarrett and Parrott had discussed the idea for a new celebration at a track steeped in history should they win the race. But by the time Jarrett grabbed the checkered flag in only NASCAR’s second year at the track, he forgot about sealing the win with a kiss.

Like a good crew chief, Parrott again made the right call.

“Todd grabbed me and said, ‘Hey, remember what we talked about?’ It wasn’t until then that I remembered that we were going to do something a little different,” Jarrett recalled. “We hadn’t told any of the crew or anything like that. So we just told them to follow us and went out and had our time on the yard of bricks.”

And now, every driver from Ryan Newman (last year’s Brickyard winner) to Ryan Hunter-Reay (this year’s Indy 500 winner) kneel down and plant one on the row of bricks.

“It’s pretty cool now to see that every race winner and their teams,” Jarrett added. “Of course it’s a lot more orchestrated now than what it was at that time because we took everybody by surprise. But to even see the guys that win the Indy 500 go out and be a part of it, it’s pretty cool to know you started a tradition that will probably carry on for a long time.”

It’s just a small slice of what makes racing at Indy so special. The Brickyard may not be the marquee race to win on NASCAR’s schedule — the Daytona 500 is still No. 1 — but it’s close.

 
Bengals CB Hall cleared to practice
Written by Associated Press   
Thursday, July 24, 2014 8:00 PM

Associated Press

 

CINCINNATI — Cornerback Leon Hall jogged toward the right side of the defense and took his customary place, matched against receiver Mohamed Sanu. The play was a handoff, so Hall didn’t have to do much.

That’s not what mattered.

Hall lined up for the first 11-on-11 play in the Bengals’ first practice of training camp on Thursday, an encouraging sign for one of the NFL’s top defenses.

“It means a lot,” Hall said.

The 29-year-old cornerback tore his right Achilles tendon midway through last season, the second time he’s sustained such an injury. He tore his left Achilles in 2011 but was back as the starter the following year and played very well.

He’s made another quick and full recovery.

“There was never really a doubt in my mind,” Hall said. “It was just trying to be patient enough to go through that long process again.”

Even though he’s fine physically, Hall hasn’t been able to be on the field during offseason workouts, so he’s still got a lot of work to do on his form. At one point during the afternoon practice, he went to the sideline and worked on his side-to-side movement.

“I felt good,” he told reporters after practice. “No pain. I felt strong. My footwork wasn’t very good but that’s going to come in a few days.”

 
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