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Letter to the Editor
Written by Information submitted   
Saturday, September 28, 2013 12:03 AM

DEAR EDITOR,

A simple Thank You doesn’t seem enough to say to those whose hard work and dedication made this past weekend’s Canal Days Festival such a huge success. It starts with the Canal Days Committee and continues with the hundreds of others who sold food, ran pageants, organized events, manned museums and art shows, cleaned up or just simply helped. You all exemplify the great, indomitable spirit of Delphos.

And finally, Krendl, or as most people around here know him, Paul Krendl Not only is he an incredibly talented illusionist and entertainer, he is also a genuinely good guy. After Saturday evening’s performance, he stayed after the show to sign autographs and have pictures taken until the last person left nearly 40 minutes later. And he did it all with a big smile and genuine enthusiasm. Very proud he’s a Delphos kid.

To those who simply enjoyed the weekend, next year step up and lend a hand. Be part of something great!

Bob Ebbeskotte

Delphos

 
Letter to the Editor
Written by Staff Reports   
Saturday, September 28, 2013 12:03 AM

DEAR EDITOR:

As a citizen of Delphos and a member of Delphos City Council, I am writing this letter in support of the 1/4 percent income tax proposal on the November ballot. This 1/4 percent income tax would cost a wage earner $2.50 on every $1,000 earned.

I originally ran for City Council more than 14 years ago because I enjoy living in Delphos and raising my family here and I thought I could make a difference. The 1/4 percent income tax will not solve all of our problems over night but it will get us headed in the right direction. Over the past 14 years on Council, I feel I have made a real effort to make the right decisions on issues before Council. It certainly has been my intent to make decisions based on what is right for the City of Delphos.

I am asking for your support for the 1/4 percent income tax when you go to the polls on Nov. 5 to make sure Delphos continues to be a city we can all be proud of.

Thanks for your support,

Kevin Osting

Councilman at Large

 
Letter to the Editor
Written by Information submitted   
Saturday, September 28, 2013 12:02 AM

DEAR EDITOR:

On July 29 of this year one of our worst fears occurred; a fire at our home. I have dealt with the Delphos Fire and Rescue employees for many years in the capacity of having them teach the preschool children at Kreative Learning where I have worked for the past 16 years. Having Kevin Streets teach the little kids about safety and what to do if there is a fire is priceless when it comes to your child surviving a fire.

You never really think you will have a fire at your house. I guess what you really call it is praying you never have a fire. When it happens, you realize how valuable time is. Time is everything when you are trying to keep your house from burning to the ground. Handling the thoughts after the safety of the firemen leave your home is not easy. Trying to sleep that night waking up wondering if the fire will start back up, (even though Bunny checked the walls with the thermal sensor) is something you have a hard time dealing with. Making your 20-year-old college student sleep downstairs that very night so you can get her out if it comes back. These are all things every person must deal with when having a fire at their home.

On Sept. 8, we once again needed the services of the First Responder and EMT personnel when our son broke his tibia and fibula and needed to be transported by ambulance to the hospital. Again, time was imperative.

I have been reading some of the comments in The Delphos Herald concerning police and fire rescue. I would like to ask the citizens of the Delphos voting district: Can you really afford to wait 20-25 minutes for the fire department to reach your house? We live six miles from the fire department it took the fire department approximately 11 minutes to reach our house. I truly believe that the metal roof on our house was what kept it from being burnt to the ground in those 11 short minutes until the fire department was here to do what they do best.

When our son broke his leg, the first responder was here within 13 minutes. If you are having a massive heart attack do you think time will be important? Of course it will.

No one ever wants to use the services of the Delphos Fire and Rescue but the fact is we will use them.

It may be your house next time, or your loved one who is hurt.

I do not pretend to have any answers for the budget issues in the city of Delphos but I can tell you from personal experience, cutting our fire and rescue or police department is very disturbing to me. I ask everyone to look deep, ask yourselves do we need to cut fire, police, EMT or do we need to see where the waste really is within the city? Is the fact that some people are focusing on the overtime for the fire department or the fact that we have so many police officers really the problem? Will that fix the budget? Maybe this year but what about next year? Does this mean relying on volunteers will be our only option?

People of Delphos, I ask you to really think about taking away Delphos Fire and Rescue or Delphos Police department employees. Ask yourselves if you are going to want time on your side when you need one of these departments or do you want to have everyone with a scanner in town to keep saying please, please someone get to those people in need and 20 minutes later still saying that same prayer because that is what happens when you move to an all-volunteer department. That is what I do when I hear some of the neighboring towns call out for their department assistance of volunteers.

Please understand I am not saying volunteers are not where it is at, they, too, serve a very important purpose in our community.

Look for the fat elsewhere in the city. I am sure there is plenty of other positions that our city can live without.

Sincerely,

Brenda Hoersten

Delphos

 
Who decides who's hungry
Written by Information submitted   
Thursday, September 26, 2013 12:00 AM

By Abby J. Leibman

 

The Oct. 1 deadline is approaching for Congress to finish work on what is commonly called the “Farm Bill.” However, for millions of Americans, it’s actually the “Food Bill” — the difference between being able to put groceries on the table and going hungry.

And lawmakers seem content to let those folks go without enough food. The Senate has tentatively approved a $4-billion reduction in funding for food stamps — formally known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). This month, the House passed a bill that slashes 10 times as much. Both courses of action are unconscionable.

Rather than shredding the food stamp program, Congress must bolster its funding. That’s the only way to ensure that all Americans, including the 50 million who struggle to get enough to eat, can enjoy what should be a right in this country - freedom from hunger.

For 40 years, food stamps have been an integral part of the federal Farm Bill. SNAP’s inclusion represents a frank acknowledgment that too many Americans go hungry in spite of the huge bounty our farms produce.

But in July, for the first time, the House of Representatives turned its back on those in need and stripped food stamps entirely from the bill.

The chamber’s leaders promised to deal with SNAP separately. But they don’t mean to do any favors for the nearly 47 million Americans who receive critical assistance from SNAP.

The House’s recent approval of $40 billion in cuts to food stamps is double the $20 billion reduction it sought back in June.

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities analyzed both proposals: $20 billion worth of cuts would kick nearly two million Americans out of SNAP; the newly approved cut of $40 billion will turn away as many as six million.

Defenders of the cuts claim that they are trying to preserve the program for “families who truly need help.”

But there are many more folks who “truly need help” than SNAP presently reaches. Indeed, we should be doing more to eliminate hunger in America — not less.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service, nearly 50 million Americans live in “food-insecure households, “unable to afford sufficient food for themselves and their families. These households include more than 16 million children.

Worse, the food insecurity crisis is growing. From 2007 through 2011, the number of people unable to afford adequate food increased by more than 10 million. Those living in food insecurity now represent the highest share of the population since the agency began tracking in 1995.

In the wealthiest country in the world, such widespread hunger is unacceptable.

It was also unacceptable more than 70 years ago, when President Franklin Roosevelt delivered his historic “Four Freedoms” address to Congress, asserting that Americans had a right to “freedom from want.” He understood that a lack of access to basic nutrition undermines a person’s ability to enjoy other fundamental rights.

It’s a scandal that our lawmakers have done so little since then to make good on that promise of “freedom from want.”

The right to food was included in the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was ratified in 1948. More than 140 countries have approved an international agreement directing states to enshrine this right into law. Many have amended their constitutions to acknowledge their citizens’ right to food, including India, the world’s largest democracy, and South Africa.

Yet U.S. leaders have gone the other way - stubbornly refusing to address growing hunger in the United States.

No country is better equipped to guarantee its citizens a right to food than the United States. What’s needed now is not the means but the political will to ensure that all Americans have enough to eat.

Unfortunately, the uncertain fate of food stamps on Capitol Hill casts grave doubt on whether our leaders possess that will.

Lawmakers must understand how much is at stake. More than one in seven Americans deals with hunger every day. Congress must spare SNAP from any cuts and protect the millions of low income Americans - children, seniors, military families, working poor, and unemployed - who are in desperate need of a just “Food Bill.”

 

Abby J. Leibman is the president and chief executive officer of Mazon: A Jewish Response to Hunger (www.mazon.org).

 
Working toward American energy independence
Written by U.S. Senator Rob Portman   
Saturday, September 21, 2013 12:23 AM

BY U.S. SENATOR

ROB PORTMAN

 

This week, the United States Senate began to debate a bill I introduced called the Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act. This bill—the first major piece of energy legislation to come to the Senate floor in six years—is the next step in the all-of-the-above energy strategy we need to achieve energy independence.

We were reminded again over the past few weeks why that energy independence is so important. The Middle East, where much of our energy comes from, is often a volatile and unstable region. Since our economy depends on cheap, reliable sources of energy, disruptions in places like Syria have consequences far beyond their borders, often leading directly to an increase in the price of oil, with effects throughout markets of every kind.

We should not be held hostage to events happening a world away. Instead, we should find ways to produce more energy here at home, while practicing good stewardship of the resources we have. For instance, I have been a vocal proponent of domestic production. Technology has opened new areas to exploration, including the Marcellus and Utica Shale in Northeast and Eastern Ohio, which we should support. And I have advocated for common-sense, environmentally sound projects like the Keystone XL Pipeline. But I also believe there is room to improve in the area of energy efficiency.

That’s where the Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act (ESIC) comes in. By encouraging smart, common-sense techniques that will not increase federal spending, we can help manufacturers to cut costs and conserve energy while also forcing the largest energy user in the world—the United States federal government—to tighten its belt and save taxpayer dollars.

The proposals contained in this bill are common-sense reforms that we’ve needed for a long time. ESIC doesn’t contain any mandates on the private sector. In fact, many of its proposals come as a direct result of conversations with people in the private sector about how we can help them become more energy efficient while also saving money that they can then reinvest in their businesses and communities.

This legislation helps manufacturers. It reforms the Advanced Manufacturing Office by providing clear guidance on its responsibilities, one of which is to help manufactures develop energy saving technology for their businesses. It instructs the Department of Energy to assist with onsite efficiency assessments for manufacturers. It facilitates the already existing efforts of companies around the country to implement cost-saving energy efficiency policies by streamlining the way government agencies in this arena work together. And it increases partnerships with national laboratories and energy service and technology providers to leverage private sector expertise towards energy efficiency goals.

This legislation also establishes university-based Building Training and Assessment Centers, modeled after existing Industrial Assessment Centers located around the country, including one in Dayton, Ohio. These centers will train the next generation of workers in energy-efficient commercial building design and operation. Not only will these programs save resources, but they will help provide our students and unemployed workers with the skills they need to compete in the growing energy field.

This legislation will save taxpayers money. It makes the largest energy user in the world—the United States federal government—practice what it preaches by requiring it to adopt energy saving techniques that make its operations more efficient and less wasteful. This bill directs DOE to issue recommendations that employ energy efficiency on everything from computer hardware to operation and maintenance processes, energy efficiency software, and power management tools. It also takes the common-sense step of allowing the General Services Administration to update building designs to meet efficiency standards that have been developed since those designs were finalized. The government has been looking for places to tighten its belt; energy efficiency is a good place to start.

Energy legislation can sometimes be controversial, as it can include provisions that hurt employers and restrict economic growth. This energy bill is different. This is a bill that helps to create jobs, not destroy them. It is a bill that is supported by more than 260 businesses, associations and advocacy groups, including the National Association of Manufacturers, the Sierra Club, the Alliance to Save Energy, and the United States Chamber of Commerce. According to a recent study of our legislation, by 2030, ESIC will save consumers $13.7 billion a year in reduced energy costs by 2030.

All this adds up to a piece of legislation that Americans across the spectrum can support. This bill makes good environmental sense. It makes good energy sense. And it makes good economic sense, too.

I look forward to seeing it become law.

 
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