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Spring has sprung. Me too?
Written by Staff Reports   
Monday, April 08, 2013 9:21 AM

I am super excited about the sunshine and warmer temperatures we had this week. I am so ready for more. Sadly enough the weatherman is not so obliging. Par for the course, really, we all know when the temperatures rise in the spring, rain is on the way.

I’ve still seen a few snow piles here and there. They look really out of place. So does my winter coat. I think I’m just gonna hang it on a back hook so I can’t see it so well.

I can’t wait for the day you can throw open the windows and let winter air out of the house.

I saw a cute post on Facebook from Jeff Foxworthy on how you might me from Ohio if you’ve had the heat on, air conditioning on and back to heat in the same day. Another one was “you might be from Ohio if 10 degrees is a little chilly.” Make fun of our weather all you want; it will change in a few minutes anyway.

So I saw a few things I could take care of outside over the weekend. Not really big things but they would make a big difference and perhaps get me going. Truth be told, I get a little overwhelmed in the spring when so much needs done. I’m just going to put in a little time each day or so that is nice enough to be outside and I bet I can accomplish more than I think I can.

I do have to say I love the end result. I despise pulling weeds but I love the look of clean, freshly mulched landscaping. Can’t have one without the other.

My knees already ache at the thought of all the work that has to be done on them. I’m not old and I don’t feel old but I’m no spring chicken and I don’t feel like one of those, either.

My husband and I have joked that if we could afford it, we would concrete our whole property. The all we’d have to do is hose off the “yard” and we’d be done. I think we would miss all the color and textures, just not the work.

Perhaps we’ll just put in some awesome AstroTurf like the Brady back yard. My husband and I have been watching the reruns off and on and we notice a lot more of the silliness now than we did when younger. Did you notice there is no glass in the sliding doors to the patio or the back yard? Just checking. That should have been a question on trivia night. I’d have gotten that one.

Anywho, I’m just ready for a little better weather, some sunshine and a fresh breeze that doesn’t chill me to the bone.

I have a plan for the plants this year, too. We’re not going to buy them quite as early. We’re going to hang in there and get them a little later and forgo all this carrying in and carrying out when the temperature dips down. Flowers just don’t look as pretty once you’ve carried them in and out of the house or garage a half-dozen times.

Ah, spring. So much to do, so little time and here it is.

I’m hoping to put on my “big girl” pants this year and get a head start and not wait for the other half to start in. Of course I say that every year and it just doesn’t happen and I have no reason to believe this year will be any different.

I wonder if there will be enough sunshine today to work a few puzzles on the picnic table? Weatherman says not really but what does he know?

 
Spring has sprung. Me too?
Written by Nancy Spencer   
Saturday, April 06, 2013 12:47 AM

I am super excited about the sunshine and warmer temperatures we had this week. I am so ready for more. Sadly enough the weatherman is not so obliging. Par for the course, really, we all know when the temperatures rise in the spring, rain is on the way.

 

I’ve still seen a few snow piles here and there. They look really out of place. So does my winter coat. I think I’m just gonna hang it on a back hook so I can’t see it so well.

 

I can’t wait for the day you can throw open the windows and let winter air out of the house.

 

I saw a cute post on Facebook from Jeff Foxworthy on how you might me from Ohio if you’ve had the heat on, air conditioning on and back to heat in the same day. Another one was “you might be from Ohio if 10 degrees is a little chilly.” Make fun of our weather all you want; it will change in a few minutes anyway.

 

So I saw a few things I could take care of outside over the weekend. Not really big things but they would make a big difference and perhaps get me going. Truth be told, I get a little overwhelmed in the spring when so much needs done. I’m just going to put in a little time each day or so that is nice enough to be outside and I bet I can accomplish more than I think I can.

 
Letter to the Editor - Grothouse
Written by Our Viewers   
Monday, April 01, 2013 8:37 AM

DEAR EDITOR:

There has been some time passed since a last review of the pricing of our precious liquid gold. Better know as “Gasoline”. In my past letter, I noted the prices and how they were not consistent in the downward movement (prices dropping) when comparing the pricing of surrounding stations. My previous observations showed our stations to have a difference of 12-15 cents per gallon higher during the downward trending time period.

After the previous letter to the editor, the weekly variation in pricing seemed to follow suit with other stations in the area, within a few pennies. But, I am sad to say, that over time the competitiveness in pricing has gradually eroded and the variance in prices has set a new high.

Today we are facing the same situation as before. Similar/simultaneous pricing as the prices increase and slower reductions as the prices drop in the area. This time, the pricing spread is even more outrageous.

On today’s pricing, I recorded a whopping 21 cents per gallon higher price here within our city, compared to other stations in the area. It looks to me as though we have returned to the same glutinous, monopolizing organizations of earlier last summer/fall, taking advantage of a captive audience unable, for what ever reason, to shop elsewhere for their needs.

Is the 21 cents extra per gallon in your pockets worth it?

John Grothouse

Delphos

 
I wish you enough ...
Written by Nancy Spencer   
Friday, March 29, 2013 11:53 PM

The key to solving many our problems is often less complicated than we make it. Sometimes they aren’t problems at all but something we need to experience to grow.

A necessary evil if you will.

I ran this before and I came across it while I was researching for the News Then column that runs each day. I thought it was worth sharing again, this being the season for sacrifice and humility.

“I wish you enough ... ”

I recently I overheard a mother and daughter in their last moments together at the airport. They had announced departure. Standing near the security gate, they hugged and the mother said, “I love you and I wish you enough.”

The daughter replied, “Mom, our life together has been more than enough. Your love is all I ever needed. I wish you enough, too, Mom.”

They kissed and the daughter left. The mother walked over to the window where I was seated. Standing there, I could see she wanted and needed to cry. I tried not to intrude on her privacy but she welcomed me in by asking, “Did you ever say good-bye to someone knowing it would be forever?”

“Yes,” I replied. “Forgive me for asking but why is this a forever good-bye?”

“I am old and she lives so far away. I have challenges ahead and the reality is, the next trip back will be for my funeral,” she said.

“When you were saying good-bye, I heard you say ‘I wish you enough.’ May I ask what that means?”

She began to smile.

“That’s a wish that has been handed down from other generations. My parents used to say it to everyone. When we said ‘I wish you enough,’ we were wanting the other person to have a life filled with just enough good things to sustain them.”

Then turning toward me, she shared the following as if she were reciting from memory:
I wish you enough sun to keep your attitude bright;
I wish you enough rain to appreciate the sun more.
I wish you enough happiness to keep your spirit alive;
I wish you enough pain so that the smallest joys in life appear much bigger.
I wish you enough gain to satisfy your wants;
I wish you enough loss to appreciate all that you possess.
I wish you enough hellos to get you through the final good-bye.
To all my loved ones, friends and readers: I wish you enough!

 
Let them lose
Written by Kirk Dougal   
Monday, March 25, 2013 8:50 AM

“Winning is great, sure, but if you are really going to do something in life, the secret is learning how to lose. Nobody goes undefeated all the time. If you can pick up after a crushing defeat, and go on to win again, you are going to be a champion someday.”

 

Wilma Rudolph - multiple Gold medal-winning Olympian

 

 

 

The sound you may have heard echoing out of the Times Bulletin office earlier this week was our head exploding.

While this opening statement is hyperbole, of course, one of our greatest pet peeves recently made itself known again. It is the notion of either including everyone in awards or doing away with them altogether, just so someone’s feelings are not hurt.

David Fabrizio, the principal at Ipswich High School in Massachusetts, on Wednesday announced he was canceling the school’s long-standing tradition of Honors Night. The event recognizes the academic achievements of students at the school. In a letter to parents, he said his reason for the decision was the realization that not winning an award might be “devastating” to some students.

This follows only a day after a report that revealed that elementary school systems in Kingston, South West London and Surrey in England have enacted “best friend” bans. The school officials’ reasoning in this case was that children should not need to suffer the “pain of splitting up with their best friend.” Also, some children may not make close friends and they would feel left out. So at these schools, all children were told to play in large groups only.

Excuse us while we tape our head back together.

There have always been winners in life. In fact, life is based upon winning. Darwin’s Theory of Evolution sat upon a foundation of certain genetic traits being passed down to offspring by the winners, those people/animals who stayed alive.

But even more important than winning is losing. Yes, losing. Look again at the quote by Wilma Rudolph at the top of this editorial. Notice that she put more emphasis on what came out of learning from losses than from winning races.

Another world class athlete thought the same way:

“I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times, I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”

This person was cut from his high school varsity basketball program as a sophomore and instead was sent to the junior varsity squad. In his place was named another sophomore, a classmate, by the name of Leroy Smith. While Smith went on to play NCAA Division I basketball and later have a solid professional career in Europe, the speaker of this quote used that stinging rebuke of not making the varsity to fuel his passion for decades.

He was so good on the junior varsity team that the varsity players used to sneak out of the locker room before their game just to watch him play. He later said that when he needed extra energy in a practice or game - even on through college and the NBA - he would close his eyes and imagine Leroy Smith. When his fame grew and he later needed to check into hotels under an assumed name, he checked in as Leroy Smith. When he left basketball for a brief career in baseball, his farewell speech said that everyone should have the “opportunity to play - no matter who, _______ or Leroy Smith, it doesn’t matter.” When Nike later launched a marketing campaign for this player, his nemesis on the court in the commercial was named Leroy Smith.

This person used the snub in favor of Leroy Smith to send himself to athletic heights that no one else has ever achieved.

This person was Michael Jordan.

We fully understand that not everyone can be a Rudolph or Jordan. In fact, that is our point.

Because the vast majority of us will never achieve the highest of the highs, we need to learn to deal with defeat, learn how to suffer through rejection, and emerge on the other side with the focus and the drive to be the best that we can possibly be in our lives. That is why it drives us mad when we hear about participation trophies in little league or certificates for everyone who shows up at the local science fair.

Last June, David McCullough made headlines nationwide when he spoke at the Wellesley High School graduation ceremony. He told the departing seniors, “You are not special. You are not exceptional. Contrary to what your U9 soccer trophy suggests, your glowing seventh grade report card… no matter how often your maternal caped crusader has swooped in to save you, you’re nothing special.”

McCullough went on to say that it had become an epidemic of thinking in America that just taking part in an activity was worth accolades. He went on to say, “I said ‘one of the best’ so we can feel better about ourselves, so we can bask in a little easy distinction, however vague and unverifiable, and count ourselves among the elite, whoever they might be, and enjoy a perceived leg up on the perceived competition. But the phrase defies logic. By definition there can be only one best. You’re it or you’re not.”

Yes, there have been, and always will be, winners and losers in life. And, yes, life is not fair when some people seemingly skate through easily to accolades while others work tremendously hard to just miss an award. But how much better is it to learn that lesson as a 12-year-old little league baseball player or a 14-year-old trying out for band than to wait and learn it as a 25-year-old at a job. There is a reason why we have so many young people who can not handle less than stellar reviews. It is because we have taught them growing up that just participating is good enough.

We need to stop depriving our children of these valuable learning lessons. Sometimes - no matter how hard it is - we need to let them lose.

 
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