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Spencerville bike patrol conceals officers PDF Print E-mail
Sunday, July 06, 2014 8:24 PM

BY STEPHANIE GROVES

DHI Media Staff Writer

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BY STEPHANIE GROVES DHI Media Staff Writer 
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 </script>  SPENCERVILLE — Spencerville Police Chief Darin Cook said that the bike patrol is an invaluable law enforcement tool allowing for easier, safer and cost-effective patrolling. Typically, bike patrols occur during the latter part of the second shift and a lot more on the third shift and on Sundays when there isn’t a lot of traffic. “The bad guys are out there looking for cruisers not bikes,” he said. “We are concealed while on the bikes. We blend in and track much more easily.” Cook said the bikes allow officers to travel down alleys and other routes a criminal on foot may run and hide. “Arrests are made much easier and we are catching people drinking and doing drugs in cars and breaking into homes or cars,” he reported. If an officer makes an arrest while on bike patrol, the individual in custody is walked back to the police station. When an individual can not be mobilized — they are combative or too intoxicated to walk — one officer stays with the apprehended individual and the other travels back to the station to get the cruiser and drive back to the scene to pick up and transport the individual to jail. “Our guys like riding and volunteer to do extra work on patrol,” he said. “I encourage them to ride for the health benefits.” Cook said 15 years ago, he stopped an individual driving a moped while intoxicated and he had to pedal pretty fast and shift gears to catch up with him. “I got beside of him, grabbed a hold of him and told him he had better stop or we were both going down,” Cook said. These days Cook does not get to ride as much as he would like. Spencerville’s bike patrol started in the late 1990s when the Allen County Sheriff’s Department invited the officers to participate in a 40-hour course. “The majority of the time we spent riding bikes,” Cook said. “We started out on small rides and by the end of the course, we rode from Lima’s Fraternal Order of Police hall on Robb Avenue, down the country roads to Delphos and back to Lima.” Cook said the 18-speed Schwinn mountain bikes used for the patrol cost $400-$500.SPENCERVILLE — Spencerville Police Chief Darin Cook said that the bike patrol is an invaluable law enforcement tool allowing for easier, safer and cost-effective patrolling.

Typically, bike patrols occur during the latter part of the second shift and a lot more on the third shift and on Sundays when there isn’t a lot of traffic.

“The bad guys are out there looking for cruisers not bikes,” he said. “We are concealed while on the bikes. We blend in and track much more easily.”

Cook said the bikes allow officers to travel down alleys and other routes a criminal on foot may run and hide.

“Arrests are made much easier and we are catching people drinking and doing drugs in cars and breaking into homes or cars,” he reported.

If an officer makes an arrest while on bike patrol, the individual in custody is walked back to the police station. When an individual can not be mobilized — they are combative or too intoxicated to walk — one officer stays with the apprehended individual and the other travels back to the station to get the cruiser and drive back to the scene to pick up and transport the individual to jail.

“Our guys like riding and volunteer to do extra work on patrol,” he said. “I encourage them to ride for the health benefits.”

Cook said 15 years ago, he stopped an individual driving a moped while intoxicated and he had to pedal pretty fast and shift gears to catch up with him.

“I got beside of him, grabbed a hold of him and told him he had better stop or we were both going down,” Cook said.

These days Cook does not get to ride as much as he would like.

Spencerville’s bike patrol started in the late 1990s when the Allen County Sheriff’s Department invited the officers to participate in a 40-hour course.

“The majority of the time we spent riding bikes,” Cook said. “We started out on small rides and by the end of the course, we rode from Lima’s Fraternal Order of Police hall on Robb Avenue, down the country roads to Delphos and back to Lima.”

Cook said the 18-speed Schwinn mountain bikes used for the patrol cost $400-$500.

 

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