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House delays formal vote on calamity day bill PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, February 12, 2014 9:12 PM

COLUMBUS (AP) — The Ohio House has held off taking a formal vote on a plan to let schools take up to four additional days off this year because of the season’s extreme weather.

A House spokesman said Wednesday that members plan to take an additional week to continue to work on the number of days in the proposal and review its costs.

Snow and frigid temperatures has led many districts across Ohio to exhaust their five allowable calamity days. Some have cancelled classes for 10 or more days.

Meanwhile, some schools are using “blizzard bag” take-home or online assignments to make up missed classes.

Gov. John Kasich has been among those advocating adding extra snow days on a one-time basis this year.

Another proposal slated to get a Senate hearing Wednesday would excuse high school seniors from makeup days that fall after their scheduled graduation ceremonies.

Ohio schools will get an extra week to administer required state achievement tests to third- through eighth-graders due to the effects of severe winter weather that has delayed and canceled classes, Ohio’s state superintendent said Tuesday.

Many districts are scrambling to keep pace with classroom topics that students face on the Ohio Achievement Tests starting in April.

Superintendent Richard Ross told members of the state school board that the testing window will be expanded from three weeks to four weeks, running from April 21 to May 16.

The timetable for administering the Ohio Graduation Test has not changed.

Schools in at least 10 states and the District of Columbia have run out of wiggle room in their academic calendars, forcing them to cut short planned breaks, hold class on holidays, add extra days to the end of the year or otherwise compensate for the lost time.

Students will make up at least three days in Philadelphia and New Haven, Conn., and two in Washington, D.C. Delaware schools have missed a week’s worth of class, and more than half of Maryland’s school districts reached or exceeded their allotted snow days. Boston is extending its school year by nearly a week.

The schedule shuffle is a pain for parents and educators trying to plan for schoolwork and child care now and vacation time later.

 

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