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Engineer dies after making last run PDF Print E-mail
Friday, January 24, 2014 9:46 PM

Scarcely three hours after Silas Coon, 66, had made his last run as a trainman for the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, completing 46 years of service, he died of angina pectoris.

Delphos Herald,

Oct. 29, 1928

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Arnold “Boxcar” Smith, 20, had a narrow escape from serious injury or death Friday night when he fell from the third floor of the “rotary” room at the Hinde & Dauch papermill and was injured.

He was rendered unconscious in the fall and did not come to for more than an hour. He was hurried to the office of a local physician in the Harter & Brenneman ambulance. It was found that he had sustained a cut above the left eye and took four stitches, a deep cut on the nose requiring one stitch and a severe burn on the right shoulder.

Smith is not employed at the paper mill and states that he does not know how he happened to be there. His last recollection, he states, is speaking to a man at Fifth and Main street. He does not remember walking to the mill and did not realize that he had been injured there.

The accident occurred at a place on the third floor where straw is passed into the “rotary.”

Delphos Herald,

Oct. 27, 1928

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Some Improvements

In Prospect at Local

R.R. Yards

A party of engineers arrived in Delphos Wednesday and started the work of surveying for a proposed new Y which the company has been planning to put in here.

Negotiations are understood to be under way for the purchase of land east of the yards from Henry Schwartzengraber. This land will be needed for the construction of the Y.

Delphos Herald,

Oct. 31, 1928

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Police Jail Youths

Fifteen Lima youths were jailed Monday night for destruction of property. Several girls were released after promising to stay off the street at night. Six plain clothesmen and two motorcycle officers are watching the young folks in their Halloween’s stunts.

Delphos Herald,

Oct. 30,1928

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Lima Has a

New Service

By arrangement with a radio shop in Lima, fans may get first-class music without installing a radio. This shop puts in a loud speaker and volume control box for the same cost of a telephone. The music is received at a central studio and relayed over telephone wires. Sixty-five people are taking advantage of the offer.

Delphos Herald,

Oct. 30, 1928

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Thieves Stole Honey

From Leiningers

Fred Leininger and Son are losers of approximately $75 as the result of the work of thieves who visited one of their bee yards and stole honey from the hives.

When they visited the farm of Mrs. Mary Morbaugh, one mile south of Monticello, Tuesday afternoon, local beemen found that their apiary had been entered by thieves and 300 pounds of honey had been taken.

This honey is valued at $50 and the value of damage to the frames will bring the total loss to about $75.

Tracks found at the scene indicated that the thieves had driven into the beeyard with a heavy truck.

A standing reward is posted by the Tri-County Beekeepers’ Association for information leading to the conviction of the thieves.

Delphos Herald,

Oct. 31, 1928

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About Morris’

Filling Station

The Morris filling station matter was brought up for discussion in council meeting.

The curb at the filling station was cut last week and entrances much wider than had been authorized by the city officials had been constructed. This action had followed refusal of the city officials to grant entrances as wide as Mr. Morris had asked, although some addition to the 16-foot width had been allowed.

Mayor Williams and Service Director Bryan had stated that they would insist on the curb restored.

Members of the council were of the opinion that the filling station constructed by Mr. Morris at Main and Fourth streets is a substantial improvement and they passed a resolution requesting the officials not to start suit to enforce restoration of the curbs.

Delphos Herald,

Oct. 24, 1928

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Melody Girls To Sing

at K.C. Meeting

The Melody Girls Quartet of Ottoville will sing at the meeting of the Delphos Council, Knights of Columbus, next Monday night. With this special feature on the program, council officials are anticipating an extra large attendance at this meeting.

Delphos Herald,

Oct. 30, 1928

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French Fighter

Fought in Delphos

Gaston Charles, French featherweight, who fought in Delphos last June against Billy Evans, fought in New York Monday night in a 10-round bout with Tony Canzoneri, former featherweight champion.

Charles put up a good fight but was shaded by Canzoneri.

Clyde Biederman and Casper Fossel, who staged the show in which Charles appeared in Delphos, are planning to put on another show here in the future.

Delphos Herald,

Oct. 30, 1928

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Twenty-Two-Year-Old

Invents Metal Process

Oberlin College unveiled a tablet in honor of a boy who worked his way through college and left it $12,000,000 when he died.

The boy was Charles M. Hall and on Feb. 23, 1886, in a woodshed lab, he invented the process for making aluminum. He was then 22 years old.

When Hall found the key to his process, he at once told Prof. Jewett, the professor of chemistry. Jewett’s good memory of the event caused William H. Taft to decide a famous lawsuit in Hall’s favor.

At chapel exercises today, the students were told how chemists in this country and Europe had worked to find a process that would put aluminum into everyday use. A few months later, the same invention was independently discovered by Frenchman Paul Heroult.

Delphos Herald,

Oct. 30, 1928

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