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Window to the Past - Joseph Moenter struck by auto, killed PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, September 21, 2013 12:14 AM

Jos. Moenter, 51, was fatally injured Friday noon when he was struck by an automobile in front of his home on Harding Highway, just east of Delphos.

Mr. Moenter had been talking to Bert Metcalfe, rural mail carrier whose machine, headed west, was stopped on the north side of the road. He started for the house intending to bring out a crate of eggs for shipment, failed to see or hear the approaching car from the east and was struck and hurled to the pavement.

His head struck the pavement and he sustained a double fracture of the skull and a dislocation of the neck. He remained in an unconscious condition from about 11:30 until death came at 1:15.

The machine that struck him was a closed car driven by H.V. Evans, sales manager for the Rapid Bottle Washer company.

Mr. Evans was accompanied by his wife and two children and by his mother, Mrs. Emily Z. Evans of Constine, Mich.

He states that he was coming to Delphos and was at about 30 miles an hour at the time of the accident. Mr. Evans says that he saw Mr. Moenter standing with his foot on the running board of Mr. Metcalfe’s car and that he sounded his horn but the fact that the engine on Mr. Metcalfe’s machine was running probably prevented him from hearing it.

He saw Mr. Moenter turn from the standing car as he was almost opposite. He swung farther to the left to leave Mr. Moenter plenty of room but Mr. Moenter was facing west and started across the road. Mr. Evans stated that he headed for the ditch and not knowing that Mr. Moenter had been struck until after the car came to a halt in the ditch at the south side of the road.

Following the accident, Mr. Moenter was carried to his home and physicians were summoned, including his brother-in-law, Dr. J.F. George. Nothing could be done however.

Jos. Moenter was born and reared just east of Delphos. He was born May 12, 1873.

He was married to Miss Emma George in Delphos about seven years ago. No children were born to this union.

He is survived by his wife and four brothers and one sister; John, east of Delphos; Henry, Ottawa, Fred, east of Delphos; Mrs. William Recker, Leipsic; and Louis, east of Delphos.

No arrangements have yet been made for the funeral.

Delphos Herald,

Mar. 20, 1925

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Lindeman Opens

Grain Elevator at

Scotts Crossing

The elevator which has been erected at Scotts Crossing by M.B. Lindeman of Delphos has been completed and will be open for business, Wednesday, September 3.

The elevator was moved from Roselm, where Mr. Lindeman formerly conducted it, because of the discontinuance of the Findlay, Fort Wayne and Western railroad.

At his new location, Mr. Lindeman will handle flow, feed and grain and also deal in coal. With the rich farming country around Scotts Crossing and the excellent transportation provided by the Pennsylvania, Mr. Lindeman will no doubt find his new venture a success.

Delphos Herald,

Sept. 2, 1919

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Royal Billiard Parlor

Changes Hands

Gilbert Kramer and Jerome Miller, both of Ottoville, are preparing to reopen the Royal Billiard Parlors in this city. They have purchased the business from A.J. Wilhelm and will operate as a billiard parlor and bowling alley.

Mr. Kramer formerly resided in this city. He and Mr. Miller were engaged in a similar business in Ottoville.

The interior of the business is now being redecorated and the equipment is being improved. The front is also to be repaired and repainted.

The new owners are planning to make the place attractive and to conduct a high class recreation center.

Delphos Herald,

Aug. 9, 1935

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Gene Sheeter Plans

Improvements

Gene Sheeter, who is associated with his father in an automobile wrecking and auto parts business at Main and First streets, is planning further substantial improvements to those he has already made.

He is planning to tear away the old residence property at the rear of the store building and to erect a new building there. The old building at the front will likely be torn away later and the new structure extended from the alley to Main street.

He plans to make this a two-story building to be used entirely for the firm’s business.

Mr. Sheeter has arranged a used car sales space along side the building.

Delphos Herald,

July 8, 1935

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Will Erect

New Filling Station

Richard Schaffer is planning to erect a new filling station on North Canal Street. It will be located just south of the Friemoth Brothers garage, on a lot which he bought from that firm sometime back. Materials are already on the lot.

Delphos Herald,

Mar. 28, 1925

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Four Farms Near

Delphos Are Raided

Four farm homes in this vicinity were searched Thursday morning in a raid conducted by two state officers and members of the Delphos police force.

The places visited were the farms of Fritz Williams, near Landeck; Jos. Suever, near Southworth; G.K., three miles southeast of Delphos; and George Mosies, near Elida.

Mash, ready for operating was found at the K. home, the officers stated. Nothing was found at any of the other three places.

K. was placed under arrest and was brought to Delphos and was fined $300 and costs before Mayor Lea Sers court.

Those who participated in the raid were State Officers John Powell and G.A. Mullen, of Columbus; Chief Thompson and Patrolmen Wagoner, Humphreys and Ditto.

Delphos Herald,

Mar. 26, 1925

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The Quality of

Van Wert Booze

in Question

Chief of Police W.E. Jackson has received a letter, under the dateline of Ft. Wayne, signed by J.H. Allen and party. The letter complained that the author of the letter and the members of the party, while traveling from New York to California, by automobile, stopped in Van Wert and while here, purchased two quarts of whiskey at $7.00 per quart. The letter sets forth that the whiskey was poisonous and so sickened the members of the party that they were compelled to remain in Ft. Wayne five days. The author of the letter demands prosecution of the man who sold the liquor and warns that if no action is taken by Van Wert officers, the government secret servicemen will be set upon the case. Chief Jackson is investigating the matter from the angle of an arrest of the man who sold the whiskey, if the facts warrant, and also prosecution of the buyers.

Delphos Herald,

Mar. 21, 1925

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Makes a Profit of

$90,000 Without Any

Cash Investment

Wortham, Texas — John Riley stands to clean up $90,000 in 60 days on a “shoe-string” investment. He was attracted here by the recent big oil discovery and upon arrival found out that there was a freight blockade, due to the enormous increase of railroad traffic.

The oil operators and other persons were clamoring for their shipments of derrick timbers, well equipment and general supplies. Riley had only a dollar in his pockets, but it occurred to him that he might turn the car blockage to his personal financial advantage. He quickly learned that the loaded cars were for the most part, tied up in the yards at Mexia, 10 miles south of the new oil field, and that the congestion was upon the sidings between Mexia and Wortham.

The biggest operator in the field is the Humphreys-Boyd Oil Company. Riley went to the office of Col. W.E. Humphreys, head of the company. He refused to state his business to any but Colonel Humphreys himself.

“Colonel, I have 15 big trucks. How much will you give me for their use?”

“One hundred dollars a day each for 10 hours.”

Riley closed the deal, hopped a train for Wichita Falls, hunted up 15 truck drivers, engaged them at $50 a day each for 10 hours and an additional driver for 10 hours night service and returned to Wortham and closed another deal for use of the trucks during 10 hours for the night at $100 each. The contract runs 60 days, giving him $1500 profit every 20 hours or $90,000, without any capital except his own ability to see an opportunity and seize it.

Delphos Herald,

Mar. 21, 1925

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Railroad Aids

Puzzle Fans

For the use of crossword puzzle fans the Baltimore & Ohio railroad has installed standard dictionaries on observation and club cars on all through trains on the main lines. If the puzzle fans increase, the company probably will provide dictionaries in cars on branch lines.

Delphos Herald,

Mar. 21, 1925

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