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Saturday, August 10, 2013 12:06 AM

OHIO DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

DIVISION OF WILDLIFE

Weekly Fish Ohio Fishing Report!

CENTRAL OHIO

Big Darby Creek (Franklin/Madison/Pickaway counties) - In hot summer weather, creeks and rivers can provide fishing action. Smallmouth bass and rock bass are popular sport fish in this stream west of Columbus. Casting small crankbaits or plastics resembling crayfish or shiners can be rewarding; target boulders, shoreline cover, where pools meet riffles and current eddies. Other game fish present are bluegill, carp, crappie, channel and flathead catfish, saugeye and sauger.

Indian Lake (Logan County) - Saugeye are being caught along the south bank and around the Moundwood and Dream Bridge areas; try crankbaits and worm harnesses. Fish shoreline cover, lily pads and any rip-rap on the shore for largemouth bass; try spinner baits and crankbaits. Bluegill are still being caught around lily pads and in the channels; use wax worms, nightcrawlers or crickets.

NORTHWEST OHIO

Oxbow Lake (Defiance County) - Located at Oxbow Wildlife Area, 7 miles northwest of the city of Defiance on Trinity Road, largemouth bass fishing was very good last week. With the new regulations this year, people are taking a number of the smaller fish out of the lake, which should help the age structure in the future; just about anything has been effective at catching the smaller-sized bass. Boats are allowed on the lake and there is a boat ramp available; however, boats are restricted to electric motors only.

Upper Sandusky Reservoir #2 (Wyandot County) - Located on the southeast edge of Upper Sandusky on CR 60, channel catfish have been biting at this 118-acre reservoir; the shoreline consists of rocks, a wetland shelf and sand beach area. Try fishing at the beach area and along the east shoreline; shrimp fished on the bottom or just off the bottom using slip bobbers usually work best. There is a boat ramp and dock but boats are restricted to electric motors only. The reservoir closes at 10 p.m.

NORTHEAST OHIO

Clendening Lake (Harrison County) - Channel catfish have been biting on chicken livers. Shoreline anglers have been doing well fishing for them using slip-sinker rigs around rip-rap, wood and weed edges; for larger flathead catfish, try large shad or other baitfish around wood cover. Excellent numbers of largemouth bass are also available here; target them with Texas-rigged soft plastics around wood, deep weedlines and thick weed mats, or fishing top-waters at low light.

Lake Milton (Mahoning County) - Anglers have been periodically picking up walleye trolling; worm harnesses and shad-style crankbaits have been top producers. Bonus channel catfish are common; try minnows vertically jigged or deep under a bobber (around 10 feet) for crappie. Good catches of smallmouth bass have also been reported; focus on hard-bottom main-lake areas with soft plastics, crankbaits, or top-waters to target these scrappy fighters.

Tuscarawas River (Summit/Start counties) - Fishing has been excellent here recently, especially from Clinton to Massillon. Common carp, channel catfish, bowfin and bullheads have all been biting; hot baits have included cut bait, nightcrawlers and corn. Target deeper holes and areas downstream of inlets.

SOUTHEAST OHIO

Muskingum River (Coshocton/Morgan/Washington counties) - Catfish anglers should continue to be successful with some quality catches. For flathead catfish, try using live suckers, goldfish and sunfish; for channel catfish, stick to the tried-and-true nightcrawlers, chicken livers and cut bait from the river. Current eddies at any of the low-head dams and at the mouth of larger tributary streams have typically been the most productive sites; try looking for Flatheads below the McConnelsville Lock and Dam #7 using live bait, such as gizzard shad or skipjacks. Past fish in this area have weighed up to 50 pounds!

Lake Hope (Vinton County) - Fishing should continue to be productive this week. Bluegill and crappie can be caught this time of year on minnows and worms fished under a bobber. If you’re looking for bass, try using artificial top-water lures. Channel catfish can also be found in this lake, typically up to three pounds; try nightcrawlers, chicken livers or cut bait on the bottom.

SOUTHWEST OHIO

Acton Lake (Preble County) - Channel catfish are being caught at this lake in Hueston Woods State Park. Try fishing on the bottom using chicken livers or shrimp; the shoreline area between the swimming beach and Sugar Camp area has been the best.

Great Miami River (Miami/Montgomery/Warren counties) - Remember to ask permission before entering private property. Since the water levels are down, now is a great time to wade rivers and find holes to come back to later when the rivers are up; all fish like deep holes this time of year because the water is cooler, there are concentrations of bait and oxygen levels are better. Catfish are the best bet this time of year. In Miami County, fair numbers of smallmouth and rock bass are being caught in the early morning and late evening in transition areas where deep and shallow water meet, especially using soft crayfish and salted tube jigs. The fishing is slower on the Montgomery County portion but catfish are always hitting in many of the deep holes throughout. Popular spots on the river are the deeper water areas below the low-head dams; anglers can find fish lying in these deeper holes. Anglers are catching channel and flathead catfish using chicken livers, cut bait, earthworms, nightcrawlers or live goldfish, bluegill for flatheads.

OHIO RIVER

Meldahl Dam (Clermont County) - Channel catfish and flathead catfish are being caught below the dam tail waters using shad and skipjack fished tight on the bottom; the best time to fish is during the nighttime. The confluence of tributaries and the Ohio River have been producing good catches of flatheads as well; these are generally caught using live bait.

Washington County - The stretch of river behind the Lafayette Hotel in Marietta is a great site for catching large catfish; some in the 10- to 31-pound range can be caught on bluegill, shad or goldfish. The Devola Dam (on the Muskingum River) has also been a successful site for catfishing using cut baits fished tight-line. Hybrid-striped bass may also be available to catch; look for scattering schools of shad indicating feeding fish and cast towards these areas with jigs, spoons or jerkbaits.

LAKE ERIE

Regulations to Remember: The daily bag limit for walleye on Ohio waters of Lake Erie is 6 fish per angler; minimum size limit is 15 inches. … The daily bag limit for yellow perch is 30 fish per angler on all Ohio waters of Lake Erie. … The trout and salmon daily bag limit is 5; minimum size limit is 12 inches. … The black bass (largemouth/smallmouth bass) daily bag limit is 5 fish per angler; minimum size limit is 14 inches.

Western Basin: Walleye fishing was best around the Toledo water intake and West Sister Island, W of North Bass Island and at American Eagle shoal; a hit-or-miss bite has been between North Bass Island and Gull Island shoal. Trollers have been catching fish on worm harnesses or with divers and spoons; drifters are using worm harnesses with bottom-bouncers or are casting mayfly rigs. … Yellow perch fishing was best around the Toledo water intake, West Sister Island, SE/E of Kelleys Island and at Kelleys Island shoal; perch-spreaders with shiners fished near the bottom produce the most fish. … Largemouth bass fishing has been good in harbors and nearshore areas around Catawba and Marblehead.

Central Basin: Walleye fishing has been good around the weather buoy along the Canadian border, in less than 20’ of water nearshore between Huron and Vermilion and 4 miles N of Vermilion trolling crankbaits and worm harnesses. Excellent fishing was reported in 70-73’ of water N of Geneva and in 70-73’ of water NE of Ashtabula; anglers are trolling dipsy-divers, jet-divers and wire-line with yellow, pink, green and orange spoons. … Yellow perch fishing has been good 6 miles N of Huron, in 46’ NW of Rocky River (Gold Coast), in 40’ NW of Gordon Park, in 36-52’ NW of Fairport Harbor, in 48’ N of Geneva and in 50’ N of Ashtabula; spreaders with shiners fished near the bottom produce the most fish. Shore fishing off the Cleveland area piers has been slow. … Smallmouth bass fishing has been excellent in 10-20’ around harbor areas in Cleveland, Fairport Harbor, Geneva, Ashtabula and Conneaut; anglers are using nightcrawlers, soft craws, leeches and crankbaits. … White Bass fishing has been slow; best spots to try are East 55th Street and East 72nd Street piers in Cleveland and the long pier in Fairport Harbor. On the lake, look for gulls feeding on shiners at the surface; the white bass will be below. Anglers are using agitators with jigs and small spoons. … The water temperature is 69 degrees off of Toledo and 70 degrees off of Cleveland, according to the nearshore marine forecast. … Anglers are encouraged to always wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device while boating.

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Drawings to be held for Controlled Waterfowl Hunting Opportunities

FINDLAY – Waterfowl hunters are invited to participate in special drawings for controlled hunting opportunities.

The drawing dates and times are as follows:

Magee Marsh Wildlife Area Early Teal and Goose Hunt - The Magee Marsh 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Registration is from 5-6:20 p.m. at the Magee Marsh Beach Parking Lot, 13229 W. State Route 2, Oak Harbor.

Pipe Creek Wildlife Area Early Teal and Goose Hunt - Osborn Park 6:30 p.m. Aug. 22 Registration is from 5-6:20 p.m. at Osborn Park, 3910 Perkins Ave., Huron.

East Sandusky Bay Metro Park Early Teal and Goose Hunt - Osborn Park 6:30 p.m. Aug. 22. Registration is from 5-6:20 p.m. at Osborn Park, 3910 Perkins Ave., Huron.

Adult participants are required to present their current or previous year’s Ohio Wetland Stamp or Resident Hunting License. Youth hunters are required to bring their 2012 or 2013 Resident Youth Hunting License to be eligible to participate in the drawings.

For more information on Ohio’s wildlife resources, call 1-800-WILDLIFE or visit wildohio.com on the web.

 

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