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Faldo to take one last walk at Muirfield PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, July 10, 2013 12:08 AM

Associated Press

 

The toughest question for any world-class golfer is to pick his favorite course in the world. It turned out to be easy for Nick Faldo once he set some parameters.

The 6-time major champion was filming a promotional spot for Glenmorangie earlier this year when he was asked to name his favorite course and why. Faldo found himself wanting a little bit of everything, from the towering pines of Augusta National to the links courses of the British Open to the coastline of Pebble Beach.

As he tried to figure out how to mix all that together, another element entered the equation — memories.

Muirfield.

“Unsolicited, it clicked,” Faldo explained in a recent interview. “Memorability is important, isn’t it? And then I suddenly I thought, ‘Muirfield.’ That green, the 18th hole, I won two Opens, which is pretty darn cool. That probably woke me up and I thought, ‘This is really an important place to me’.”

It means enough that Faldo will play in the British Open next week for the 35th time. The opening round is on the day he turns 56.

He last competed at St. Andrews in 2010, missing the cut with an 81 when he was caught in the worst of the wind. He did not enter another tournament as a tuneup leading up to Muirfield. He is relying on memories; as good as they are, they won’t be enough for him to play like he once did.

No matter.

“It will be the last walk at Muirfield,” Faldo said. “If I could just get in the right frame of mind, if I hit the golf ball solid, that’s as good as it gets. If it goes sideways, if I can’t put a score on the card, you’re going to have to accept that.”

Faldo rarely hit it sideways, certainly not at Muirfield.

It was in 1987 when Faldo famously made 18 pars in a gloomy final round and captured the first of his three Open titles when Paul Azinger faltered. Five years later, Faldo was a machine until he made a mess of the final round, losing a 4-shot lead in five holes and then recovering with four of the best holes he ever played to beat John Cook, who helped by botching the last two holes.

Muirfield has the greatest collection of champions of any major course in the world. Faldo and James Braid are the only players to win the Open there twice.

The memories are strong. Faldo doesn’t always remember where his shots landed, only how they felt leaving his club, particularly his win in ‘92. The 5-iron on the 15th hole is one of the best shots he ever hit. Facing a left-to-right wind, he had to work the ball in the same direction and stay left of the flag to let a ridge do the work. He fed the shot into 3 feet for birdie.

“And then the driver and 4-iron on the 17th was as good as it gets,” he said. “They had a red telephone box on the corner of the grandstand. I aimed at that and hit a draw and then a perfect 4-iron 20 feet left of the flag.”

His two wins at Muirfield could not have been any more different.

Faldo can relate to Tiger Woods in one aspect — criticism and scrutiny of the swing, especially when the swing is going through a major overhaul. Faldo had already played on four Ryder Cup teams and won the Order of Merit when he rebuilt his swing under David Leadbetter and went three years without a win.

The press panned him. He recalls seeing other players mimic what he was trying to do with his swing. The worst of it was in the spring of 1987, when he arrived in the Atlanta airport and saw so many players headed east to Augusta National for the Masters. Faldo didn’t qualify. He was going in the other direction, to Hattiesburg, Miss.

Starting with the ‘87 Open at Muirfield, Faldo won four out of the next 13 majors, lost a U.S. Open playoff to Curtis Strange and had three other top 4s in the majors.

But for someone regarded as one of England’s greatest golfers, Faldo had a prickly relationship with the press. It started during the rebuilding years and didn’t improve even after he had won two Masters and two Opens at Muirfield and St. Andrews. Faldo was aloof, which didn’t help, and he was sensitive when it came to his swing. It was a bad combination.

That led to his infamous victory speech at Muirfield in 1992, when he was a rambling mess with his emotions and his words after a wild final round where he nearly blew a lead that Faldo now says would have scarred him. His voice was unsteady and he constantly fidgeted with his hair. Toward the end, he sarcastically thanked the TV commentators for telling him “how to practice and what to do and what not to do.”

The relationship he has with Muirfield is grounded only in respect and appreciation, sprinkled with the memories of two claret jugs.

THE FINAL STRETCH: In the first year of the FedEx Cup, there was so much promotion that Vijay Singh said he was tired of talking about it even before the season started. His sound advice was to worry about that when it mattered later in the year, much like the Presidents Cup or Ryder Cup standings.

It’s getting to be that time.

There are only six tournaments remaining to get into the top 125 and take part in the $35 million bonanza known as the FedEx Cup playoffs. Singh won the FedEx Cup and its $10 million bonus in 2008. Now, he is on a short list of players who have never missed the playoffs and currently are outside the top 125. Singh is at No. 136.

Others outside the top 125 who have never missed the playoffs since they began in 2007 include Sean O’Hair, Jonathan Byrd and Robert Allenby.

This would be a bad year to miss out. After the playoffs, there is no longer a Fall Series for players to make up ground. The top 125 earn cards for the following season, while the next 75 players (if not already exempt) would go to a 4-tournament series with top Web.com Tour players who play for a card.

That’s because the next season starts in October.

 

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