MLB

PHOENIX — The Cincinnati Reds won their salary arbitration case against infielder Eugenio Suarez and Chicago White Sox infielder Yolmer Sanchez became the latest player to go to a hearing.

Suarez was given a raise from $595,000 to $3.75 million on Tuesday rather than his request for $4.2 million, leaving players with a 5-3 lead. Fourteen players remain scheduled for hearings through Feb. 16 in what could be the busiest year in arbitration since 1990.

Sanchez asked for a raise from $546,000 to $2.35 million and Chicago argued he should be paid $2.1 million.





Baltimore second baseman Jonathan Schoop avoided a hearing scheduled for Thursday, agreeing to an $8.5 million, 1-year contract. His deal was $250,000 above the midpoint between the $9 million he asked for and the $7.5 million offered by the Orioles.

Suarez has been Cincinnati's starting third baseman the past two years after switching from shortstop. He .260 last season and set career highs with 26 homers and 82 RBIs on a team that finished last in the NL Central at 68-94. Arbitrators Mark Burstein, Jeanne Wood and James Darby decided in favor of the Reds, a day after hearing arguments.

Sanchez set career bests last year with a .267 average, 12 homers and 59 RBIs and .319 on-base percentage. He appeared in 78 games at second, 52 at third, four and shortstop and one in right field. A decision by arbitrators Robert Herzog, Sylvia Skratek and Walt De Treux is expected Wednesday.

OBIT

CLEVELAND — Seattle Seahawks player Frank Clark has confirmed his father and three other family members have died in a Cleveland house fire.

Clark wrote in a tweet posted Sunday evening that his father, 44-year-old Frank Clark III, died in the fire in the city's East Side on Jan. 30.

Fire officials have not publicly identified the victims, but Clark's aunt tells Cleveland.com 46-year-old Alfonso Lathan Jr., his 4-year-old son Alfonso Lathan III and 8-year-old granddaughter Niayah were also killed.

Fire officials say Alfonso Lathan's wife, 44-year-old Gianna Latham, is being treated for severe burns.

Officials say the home's smoke alarms were not working at the time of the fire. Investigators have not determined what caused the blaze.

The Seattle Seahawks offered condolences to the defensive end's family in a tweet posted Sunday.



OLYMPICS

NEW YORK — Every Olympic event will be streamed live. But to watch online, you'll still need to be a paying cable or satellite subscriber.

As with past Olympics, NBC is requiring proof of a subscription. If you've already given up on traditional cable or satellite TV, you can sign up for an online TV service such as PlayStation Vue or YouTube TV. Otherwise, your video will cut out after a half-hour grace period.

The subscription requirement also applies to coverage on virtual-reality headsets.

More than 1,800 hours of online coverage begins Wednesday evening in the U.S. with preliminary curling matches. Friday's opening ceremony will be shown live online starting at 6 a.m. ET, and on NBC's prime-time broadcast on a delayed basis at 8 p.m. NBC also plans live streaming of the closing ceremony on Feb. 25.

NBC's over-the-air network will cover popular sports such as figure skating and skiing, some of it live. For those who can't get to a TV, NBC will stream the broadcast at NBCOlympics.com and the NBC Sports app. But there you'll need your paid-TV credentials to sign in — even though you can watch the network over the air for free.

The sports network NBCSN will be the main overflow channel, carrying events such as biathlon, bobsled and luge. Coverage on CNBC and USA Network will be limited to curling and ice hockey. The Olympic Channel will have medal ceremonies, news and highlights, but not event coverage. All four of these cable channels will also be streamed online.

Much of the online coverage will come from the International Olympic Committee's Olympic Broadcasting Services. That means the spotlight will be on all athletes, not just Americans. In addition to live events, you can get streams of some training and practice runs. NBC also plans digital-only shows, including a daily two-hour wrap-up starting at noon ET (2 a.m. the next morning in Pyeongchang).

SEATTLE— The clothes, the hair, the confidence — the look of Korean pop music can feel like high fashion or just plain quirky.

But that's what draws fans to South Korea's most famous musical export.

As much as the music and lyrics themselves, the perfectly symmetrical stars and the meticulous choreography define K-pop for a country obsessed with image and beauty.

And if you've managed to elude the beats and flash of its music and videos until now, rest assured it will be hard to bypass this cultural phenomenon during the Winter Games.

Among the most viewed YouTube videos of all time with more than 3 billion hits is Psy's 2012 earworm "Gangnam Style." But that is hardly representative of the genre. It's actually a parody of K-pop drawing on its own absurdities, which experts say was fully embraced locally when it became a global touchstone of Korean culture.

Though the multibillion-dollar industry hasn't yet become truly mainstream in the U.S. and other Western countries, there's fanatical interest among millions of people old and young across Asia and in pockets of the rest of the world.

The South Korean people and government are proud of their infectious brand of music and music videos, which feature Korean lyrics dashed with catchy English phrases, vibrant fashion and elaborate dance moves. Its fans are famous for their devotion to their favorite bands, which has created a spin-off hobby involving a sizable number of Koreans gathering to recreate the complicated routines with seriousness and accuracy.

And in the U.S., American youth have driven demand for formal programs catering to their obsession. Clark Sorensen, Korea history professor and the director of the University of Washington's Center for Korea Studies in Seattle, said he developed official course material about three years ago because his students showed up to his Modern Korean Society class asking: Where's the K-pop?

The K-pop industry began in the 1990s as the country was growing as a democracy and its profile rising on the world stage. It was thought to be used to harness its rich history of highly-trained musicians and artists with the emergence of its home-grown high tech expertise, said Keith Howard, a music history expert and National Humanities Center fellow. But what began as a movement to develop cultural entertainment for its own people gave way to a massive, rabid fan base beyond its borders.

The past decade saw another wave of K-pop that is far more commercial, as talent agencies develop rigorous training programs that capitalize on both the genre's appeal as an export and as a vessel for mass-market advertising and product marketing.

What started as innocent Bubblegum pop has lately taken an edgier turn. Nods to the mainstream American taste have produced Korean hits swept up in rap, hip hop, R&B and reggae influences, as well as those that are more explicit and sexual. But that move hasn't been without criticism as observers have called it out as cultural appropriation that can be downright racist.