Courtney Ebbeskotte, left, Elizabeth Gerow, Audrey Ferguson, Rylee Pohlman and Emma Reindel have earned the Silver Award for Girls Scouts. (Submitted photo)
Courtney Ebbeskotte, left, Elizabeth Gerow, Audrey Ferguson, Rylee Pohlman and Emma Reindel have earned the Silver Award for Girls Scouts. (Submitted photo)
DELPHOS — Five girls from Delphos Girl Scout Troop 20278 have earned their Silver Award for Girl Scouts.

The Silver Award is the highest award a Cadette (grades 6-8) Girl Scout can earn. In order to earn the award, they must decide on a project that makes an impact on the community and they need 50 hours to complete it. The girls can work by themselves or in a small group.

After having outpatient surgery at Nationwide Children’s hospital in Columbus, Elizabeth Gerow decided to do something for the other patients there. With the help of her Grandma, she made colorful pillowcases for the patients who have to stay long term to help brighten their room. She also made fleece tie blankets. With the remaining money, she purchased games and toys for the patients to use to pass time. She purchased things such as coloring books, crayons, Rubik cube, Barbie, cards and other items that could be used while the child was in bed. Gerow is now in her 10th year of Girl Scouts.

Courtney Ebbeskotte, Rylee Pohlman and Emma Reindel worked in a group to help raise butterflies to release a couple years ago at the Mini Relay for Life. After learning about animals choking on balloons that were released, they decided to raise butterflies to release in memory of those affected by cancer. The girls were responsible for helping the classrooms with the caterpillars and feeding them once they turned into butterflies. Pohlman and Reindel also made fleece blankets to donate to St. Rita’s Medical Center. Ebbeskotte is beginning her 10th year; Pohlman is beginning her seventh year; and Reindel is beginning her fifth year.

After hearing stories from her mom about the patients and families in hospice, Audrey Ferguson painted prayer stones for the hospice patients’ families. With help of friends and family, she painted more than 100 rocks that were blessed before giving to the patients. The families put the stone in their love ones hand until it gets warm. After their loved one has passes, they can hold onto the stone and when it gets warm, they can feel the presence of their loved one. Ferguson is beginning her fifth year.

All of the girls are now freshmen in high school.